Status Report

NASA Mars Rover Opportunity Status 1 September 2006

By SpaceRef Editor
September 6, 2006
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NASA Mars Rover Opportunity  Status 1 September 2006
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OPPORTUNITY UPDATE: Inching Closer to ‘Victoria’ – sol 920-927, September 1, 2006:

Opportunity is healthy and still 218 meters (715 feet) from “Victoria Crater.” Over the weekend, the rover’s shoulder azimuth joint stalled as Opportunity was trying to start measurements on a trench it dug on Sol 919 (Aug. 25, 2006). Consequently, all weekend arm activities were aborted, but remote science activities were executed as planned.

Beginning on Sol 923, rover arm diagnostic measurements were taken as well as some remote sensing science. Results from the diagnostics revealed neither cause nor any damage to the stalled joint. On Sol 924, the arm performed flawlessly as Opportunity successfully completed the activities originally planned for Sol 920. On Sols 925, 926 and 927 Opportunity collected more arm diagnostics (to ensure the stow before drive would go smoothly) as well as completing all arm activities originally planned over the weekend.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 920 (Aug. 26, 2006): Opportunity did a miniature thermal emission spectrometer observation and other activities were aborted due to the arm stall.

Sol 921: The rover took a panoramic camera image.

Sol 922: Opportunity used its panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 923: The rover conducted arm diagnostics and took panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer observations.

Sol 924: Completing the activities originally planned for sol 920, Opportunity took a microscopic image and did an alpha particle X-ray spectrometer observation.

Sol 925: The rover continued to do arm diagnostics and completed a Moessbauer spectrometer observation – a completion of sol 921’s originally planned activities.

Sol 926: Opportunity continued to do arm diagnostics and completed activities originally planned for sol 922 by taking microscopic images and using the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 927: On this sol, the rover used its Moessbauer spectrometer.

As of sol 925 (August 31, 2006), Opportunity’s total odometry was 9,023.70 meters (5.61 miles).

SpaceRef staff editor.