Status Report

NASA Hubble Space Telescope Daily Report # 3522

By SpaceRef Editor
January 2, 2004
Filed under , ,

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

DAILY REPORT # 3522

PERIOD COVERED: DOYs 365/2003 – 001/2004

OBSERVATIONS SCHEDULED

S/C/NIC1/NIC3 9994

NICMOS Focus Stability

The purpose of this activity is to determine if the best focus determined in
SMOV is stable. This program will execute in approximately one month intervals
starting about 1 month after the last execution of proposal 8980.

ACS 9984

Cosmic Shear With ACS Pure Parallels

Small distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass
provide a powerful method of directly measuring the amount and distribution of
dark matter. Several groups have recently detected this weak lensing by
large-scale structure, also called cosmic shear. The high resolution and
sensitivity of HST/ACS provide a unique opportunity to measure cosmic shear
accurately on small scales. Using 260 parallel orbits in Sloan textiti {F775W}
we will measure for the first time: beginlistosetlength sep0cm
setlengthemsep0cm
setlength opsep0cm em the cosmic shear variance on scales <0.7 arcmin, em the
skewness of the shear distribution, and em the magnification effect.
endlist Our
measurements will determine the amplitude of the mass power spectrum
sigma_8Omega_m^0.5, with signal-to-noise {s/n} ~ 20, and the mass density
Omega_m with s/n=4. They will be done at small angular scales where non-linear
effects dominate the power spectrum, providing a test of the gravitational
instability paradigm for structure formation. Measurements on these scales are
not possible from the ground, because of the systematic effects induced by PSF
smearing from seeing. Having many independent lines of sight reduces the
uncertainty due to cosmic variance, making parallel observations ideal.

WFPC2 9980

The Ultra Deep Field – WFPC2 Parallels

The ACS Ultra Deep Field {UDF} is a survey carried out by using Director’s
Discretionary time. The main science drivers are galaxy evolution and
cosmology.
The primary instrument is the Advanced Camera for Surveys but WFPC2,
NICMOS, and
STIS will also be used in pure parallel mode. The data will be made public. The
UDF consists of a single ultra-deep field {410 orbits in total} within the
CDF-S
GOODS area. We request a modification of the default pure parallel programs.
Rather than duplicate the redder bands which will be done much better with ACS,
we propose to observe in the near-ultraviolet F300W filter. These data will
enable study of the rest-frame ultraviolet morphology of galaxies at 0<z<1,
allowing determination of the morphological k-correction and the location of
star formation within galaxies, using a sample that is likely to be nearly
complete with multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopic redshifts. The
results can be used to interpret observations of higher redshift galaxies by
ACS.

NIC3 9979

The Ultra Deep Field – NICMOS Parallels

This is a plan to manage the NICMOS pure parallels of the ACS Ultra Deep
Survey.
We will obtain a mix of F110W and F160W images along sight-lines within the
mosaiced ACS fields of the CDF-S GOODS and GEMS surveys, with these sight-lines
enabling an examination of the space density and morphologies of the reddest
galaxies.

ACS/CCD/WFC 9978

The Ultra Deep Field with ACS

The ACS Ultra Deep Field {UDF} is a survey carried out by using Director’s
Discretionary time. The main science driver are galaxy evolution and cosmology.
The primary instrument is the Advanced Camera for Surveys but WFPC2 and NICMOS
will also be used in parallel. The data will be made public. The UDF
consists of
a single ultra-deep field {410 orbits in total} within the CDF-S GOODS
area. The
survey will use four filters: F435W {55 orbits}, F606W {55 orbits}, F775W {150
orbits}, and F850LP {150 orbits}. The F435W {B} and F606W {V} exposures will be
one magnitude deeper than the equivalent HDF filters. The F775W {I} exposure
will be 1.5 magnitude deeper than the equivalent HDF exposure. The depth in
F775W and F850LP is optimized for searching very red objects – like z=6
galaxies
– at the detection limit of the F850LP image. The pointing will be RA{J2000}=3
32 40.0 and Decl.{J2000}=-27 48 00. These coordinates may change slightly
due to
guide star availability and implementation issues. We will attempt to
include in
the field both a spectroscopically confirmed z=5.8 galaxy and a
spectroscopically confirmed type Ia SN at z=1.3. The pointing avoids the gaps
with the lowest effective exposure on the Chandra ACIS image of CDFS. This
basic
structure of the survey represents a consensus recommendation of a Scientific
Advisory Committee to the STScI Director Steven Beckwith. A local Working Group
is looking in detail at the implementation of the survey.

ACS/WFC/WFPC2 9898

Calibration of the ACS Emission Line Filters

The emission line filter set for the ACS is seriously compromised because the
Halpha and the primary [N II] lines are transmitted equally well by the F658N
filter. This prevents an absolute calibration of these images with only a
single
filter, because one doesn’t know the intrinsic ratio of these two lines.
Absolute calibration is possible if one also makes observations in the [N II]
dominated F660N filter and the calibration constants are known. This proposal
describes a program that will allow determination of the calibration constants
for the three emission line filters and how the observations can be corrected
for continuum radiation passed through the same filters. The method was
developed originally for WFPC2 and successfully applied there. The well
calibrated Orion Nebula will be used as a reference source. Coordinate parallel
observations of previously unobserved regions of the Orion Nebula and M 43 will
be possible and these will be used to continue discovery of proplyds and other
phenomena related to young stellar objects.

STIS/MA2 9897

Time Scales for Gas Transport, Star Formation, and AGN Fueling in the
Born-again
Radio Galaxy 3C236

Now, for the first time, we can probe the duration of nuclear activity and its
duty cycle and the relationship between the growth of the bulge {via a
starburst} and the growth of the BH {via fueling the AGN}. We have identified a
class of powerful radio galaxy which displays both an outer ‘older’ radio
source
as well as an inner `younger’ radio source. These ‘double-doubles’ are sources
in which the current radio source is propagating outwards through the relic of
the previous epoch of activity. In 3C236 we found that repeated episodes of
star
formation and radio ejection were indeed temporally linked. We propose to
obtain
deep FUV, NUV, U, and V images and low dispersion optical spectroscopy of the
star forming regions in the disk of 3C236. The proposed HST observations, when
combined with our detailed radio imaging, will allow us to study the time
scales
of nuclear activity, its duty cycle, and the fueling/triggering process by age
dating the old and young radio structures and age dating the star formation
episodes in the host galaxy. The combination of these two independent and
complementary techniques for measuring the relevant time scales will allow us
for the first time to address {1} the time scales of activity in individual
objects, {2} the physics of the fueling of the central engine, and {3} the
implications for the apparently tight coupling between BH and bulge mass
growth.

NIC/NIC3 9865

The NICMOS Parallel Observing Program

We propose to continue managing the NICMOS pure parallel program. Based on our
experience, we are well prepared to make optimal use of the parallel
opportunities. The improved sensitivity and efficiency of our observations will
substantially increase the number of line-emitting galaxies detected. As our
previous work has demonstrated, the most frequently detected line is Halpha at
0.7<z<1.9, which provides an excellent measure of current star formation rate.
We will also detect star-forming and active galaxies in other redshift ranges
using other emission lines. The grism observations will produce by far the best
available Halpha luminosity functions over the crucial–but poorly
observed–redshift range where galaxies appear to have assembled most of their
stellar mass. This key process of galaxy evolution needs to be studied with IR
data; we found that observations at shorter wavelengths appear to have missed a
large fraction of the star-formation in galaxies, due to dust reddening. We
will
also obtain deep F110W and F160W images, to examine the space densities and
morphologies of faint red galaxies. In addition to carrying out the public
parallels, we will make the fully reduced and calibrated images and spectra
available on-line, with some ground-based data for the deepest parallel fields
included.

ACS/HRC 9862

ACS detection of sub-stellar companions around Vega, Fomalhaut and beta Pic via
parallax & proper motion

The first visible light coronagraph on HST provides contrast ratios near very
bright stars that are unparalleled by ground-based observations. Vega,
Fomalhaut
and Beta Pictoris have dusty debris disks with structure thought to originate
from the presence of yet-undetected, substellar companions. The detection of
substellar companions is possible with the ACS HRC coronagraph if observations
are made in two epochs. Here we propose to image Vega in two epochs within
Cycle
12. We argue that in a few months interval, the sky plane motion of any
companions due to parallax and proper motion is large relative to the HRC
astrometric uncertainties. Likewise, we propose to obtain a second epoch image
of Beta Pic and Fomalhaut within Cycle 12 to complement the single epoch
imaging
of the GTO program. Because Vega, Fomalhaut and Beta Pictoris are young and
nearby, this imaging campaign will be sensitive to brown dwarfs and massive
extrasolar giant planets at their predicted locations 40-60 AU projected radius
from each star. Either positive or negative results for each system will be
used
to constrain the physical characteristics of massive objects hypothesized to
cause the observed disk asymmetries.

ACS/WFC 9860

ESSENCE: Measuring the Dark Energy Equation of State

The accelerating universe appears to be dominated by a dark energy with a
significant negative pressure. The ratio of the pressure to density of this
mysterious energy {its equation of state} is an observable which can
differentiate between the proliferating candidate theories. We propose to
estimate the dark energy equation of state by observing Type Ia supernovae at
redshifts near z=0.7 with HST in concert with the on-going ESSENCE NOAO Survey
program that is discovering and studying supernovae between 0.3<z<0.8. We show
that an interesting constraint on the equation of state can be made with
supernovae observed at modest redshifts given the current knowledge of the
matter density. We will follow 10 Type Ia supernovae discovered from the ground
and passed to HST without disrupting its schedule. The full data set will
constrain the equation of state to 10% and strictly limit the range of possible
dark energy models. In keeping with the ESSENCE policy, these observations will
available to the community immediately.

STIS/CCD/MA1 9848

A SNAPSHOT Survey of Sharp-Lined Early B-Type Stars

Although spectrum synthesis studies of the UV spectra of sharp-lined main
sequence B stars provide us with some our best determinations of the abundances
of the Fe group and neutron capture elements and the chemical evolution in our
galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, the HST archive is virtually devoid of high
resolution spectra of the bright nearby B stars that have become to be regarded
as abundance standards. For example, there are NO observations of HR 1886, iota
Her, and tau Her, the sharpest-lined representatives {V sin i < 5 km/s} of
spectral classes B1 V, B3 IV-V and B5 IV, and only a few tiny spectral
intervals
of gamma Peg {B2 IV}. Information on the abundances of the Fe group is
important
for computing opacities for stellar evolution calculations and for determining
astrophysical f-values. There are no suitable galactic standards in the HST
database to compare with recent HST/STIS observations of B stars in the
Magellanic Clouds and the likely future observations of similar objects in M31
and other nearby galaxies. To correct this deficiency, we propose SNAPSHOT
observations with the STIS E140M and E230M gratings of 33 of the best bright
abundance standards in nearby clusters and the galactic field. Using this data
we will determine the abundances of the Fe group and heavy elements using the
technique of spectrum synthesis with LTE and NLTE treatments. We waive the
proprietary period.

ACS/HRC 9812

Ultraviolet Emission from Protostellar Accretion Disks

We propose to obtain ACS/prism observations of the UV continuum emitted by
protostellar accretion disks. By combining the ACS data with simultaneous
ground-based optical spectra and near-IR photometry, we will be able to observe
the entire spectral energy distribution of the young stars and their disks from
1800A to 3.5um. The combined data set will solve the long-standing problem of
degeneracy between reddening, spectral type, and excess emission in the
analysis
of such spectra by allowing us to measure reddenings directly from the 2175A
bump, bolometric corrections from the UV continuum, and effective temperatures
from the optical spectra. With this information in hand it will be possible for
the first time to quantify the mass accretion rates, stellar radii, masses, and
ages without the systematic uncertainties that have plagued previous efforts.
The new data will probe the physical conditions that exist where material from
the disk falls onto the star, such as filling factors, temperatures, and
optical
depths. We will also be able to place heavily veiled stars unambiguously in HR
diagram for first time to see if these stars are on average younger than their
more slowly accreting counterparts, and test whether or not the Mg II 2800A
doublet traces jets close to their stars. The proposed observations will yield
the first simultaneous coverage over all the principal wavelengths that these
accretion disks emit; a true multiwavelength approach is the only way to
clarify
what goes on in accretion/outflow systems, a process common throughout
astrophysics.

ACS/WFC/WFPC2 9810

Accurate and Robust Calibration of the Extragalactic Distance Scale with the
Maser Galaxy NGC4258

The extragalactic distance scale {EDS} is defined by a comparison of Cepheid
Period-Luminosity {PL} relations for nearby galaxies and the LMC, whose
uncertain distance is thereby the SOLE anchor. Studies of maser sources
orbiting
the central black hole in the galaxy NGC4258 have provided the most accurate
extragalactic distance ever {7.2+/- 0.5Mpc}. Since this distance is well
determined and based on GEOMETRIC arguments, NGC4258 can provide a much needed
new anchor for the EDS. We propose multi-epoch BVIH observations of NGC4258 in
order to discover about 100 Cepheids and to characterize their light curves
with
2-3 times greater accuracy than was previously possible with WFPC2. At 90
orbits
{48 in Cycle 12; 42 in Cycle 13}, this is a relatively large program. However,
the result will have a major impact on the EDS, and substantial attention must
be paid to characterization and minimization of systematic errors, as from
metallicity, crowding, and blending. The resulting dataset will be the most
complete for Cepheids in any galaxy yet studied with HST. In an ongoing
NASA-funded program {OSS-SARA}, we are using new analysis techniques and radio
data to reduce uncertainty in the geometric distance to < 3% {0.07 mag}. With
this improved geometric distance and the BVIH data, we will be able to
calculate
the zero point of the PL relation ROBUSTLY to <4% {0.09 mag}.

WFPC2 9809

Saturn’s rings and small moons on the eve of Cassini

We propose to continue our long-term survey of Saturn’s rings and small
moons to
obtain a coherent set of high resolution, multi-color WFPC2 images of
Saturn and
its rings during the final year before the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at
Saturn in mid-2004. Our Cycle 6-11 programs {6806, 7427, 8398, 8660, 8802, and
9341} explored the rings from their nearly edge-on aspect {southern hemisphere
spring} to summer solstice in late 2002. We now propose to take advantage
of the
especially favorable viewing geometry of Cycle 12 to obtain UBVRI, F255W, and
methane-filter PC images of the rings, small moons, and planet at the lowest
phase angle {0.07 degrees} observable to date. A key goal is to measure for the
first time the expected sharp spike in the opposition brightness of the rings
and small moons, which will characterize the structure and particle properties
of the rings and the surfaces of the satellites. We will also follow the
chaotic
behavior of Prometheus and Pandora, two small moons which may be perturbing
each
other gravitationally. Here, our goals are to catch the satellites in the
act of
any new coupled motions and to determine the changes in semimajor axis,
eccentricity, and orbital inclination of the moons resulting from their most
recent large chaotic interaction in 2000. This will complete our continuous
WFPC2 coverage of these moons from 1994 until mid-2004, when Cassini’s cameras
will at long last surpass the capabilities of the HST. The Cycle 12
observations
will also enable us to determine zonal winds and regional variations in
Saturn’s
atmosphere prior to Cassini’s arrival.

STIS 9786

The Next Generation Spectral Library

We propose to continue the Cycle 10 snapshot program to produce a Next
Generation Spectral Library of 600 stars for use in modeling the integrated
light of galaxies and clusters. This program is using the low dispersion UV and
optical gratings of STIS. The library will be roughly equally divided among
four
metallicities, very low {[Fe/H] lt -1.5}, low {[Fe/H] -1.5 to -0.5}, near-solar
{[Fe/H] -0.3 to 0.1}, and super-solar {[Fe/H] gt 0.2}, well-sampling the entire
HR-diagram in each bin. Such a library will surpass all extant compilations and
have lasting archival value, well into the Next Generation Space Telescope era.
Because of the universal utility and community-broad nature of this venture, we
waive the entire proprietary period.

ACS/HRC/SBC 9745

From molecules to aerosols: observing the haze creation process during Titan’s
polar summer

Our Cycle 11 observations of Titan at southern summer solstice reveal
unexpected
complexity and an opportunity for science that has not previously been
possible.
Titan currently has a polar hood below 65 degrees S. The polar hood is dark in
the visible relative to the southern mid-latitudes, as is Titan’s northern
hemisphere. In the UV and near-IR, the hood is spectrally distinct from the
better-known north-south asymmetry, indicating a different formation mechanism.
The nature of the relation between the southern summer hood and the northern
spring equinox polar hood observed by Voyager is uncertain. We propose a set of
ultraviolet and supporting observations to demonstrate the nature of temporal
changes in the hood and to look for expected stratospheric absorbing
gasses. The
gasses are precursors to Titan’s aerosols; the polar hood may be an early stage
of aerosol evolution. Our observations will provide important constraints
on the
chemistry and dynamics of Titan’s stratosphere at summer solstice. The
chance to
follow-up our observations of the polar hood will allow us to assess the
processes and changes that are occurring now, so that Cassini observations of
the polar regions will not need to be interpreted in isolation from seasonal
context.

NIC2 9726

A NICMOS search for obscured supernovae in starburst galaxies

Recent near-IR monitoring campaigns were successful in detecting obscured
supernovae {SNe} in starburst galaxies. The inferred SN rate is much higher
than
that obtained in previous optical campaigns, but it is still significantly
lower
than expected by the high level star formation of these systems. One possible
explanation for the shortage of SNe is that most of them occur in the nuclear
region, where the limited angular resolution of groundbased observations
prevents their detection. We propose NICMOS SNAP observations of a sample of
starburst galaxies already observed once by NICMOS, with the goal of exploiting
its sensitivity and angular resolution to detect nuclear obscured SNe which
might have been missed by groundbased surveys. These observation will allow to
assess the real SN rate in starbust galaxies and deliver a sample of SN
occurring in the extreme environment of galactic nuclei. We expect to detect
more than 55 SNe {if the whole sample is observed}. If the number of SNe
detected in the program is much lower than expected it would prompt for a
revision of our understanding of the relation between the star formation rate
and the SN rate.

WFPC2 9712

Pure Parallel Near-UV Observations with WFPC2 within High-Latitude ACS Survey
Fields

In anticipation of the allocation of ACS high-latitude imaging survey{s}, we
request a modification of the default pure parallel program for those WFPC2
parallels that fall within the ACS survey field. Rather than duplicate the red
bands which will be done much better with ACS, we propose to observe in the
near-ultraviolet F300W filter. These data will enable study of the rest-frame
ultraviolet morphology of galaxies at 0<z<1. We will determine the
morphological
k-correction, and the location of star formation within galaxies, using a
sample
that is likely to be nearly complete with multi-wavelength photometry and
spectroscopic redshifts. The results can be used to interpret observations of
higher redshift galaxies by ACS.

WFPC2 9709

POMS Test Proposal: WFII parallel archive proposal

This is the generic target version of the WFPC2 Archival Pure Parallel program.
The program will be used to take parallel images of random areas of the sky,
following the recommendations of the 2002 Parallels Working Group.

NICMOS/STIS CCD 9405

The Origin of Gamma-Ray Bursts

The rapid and accurate localization of gamma-ray bursts {GRBs} promised by a
working HETE-2 during the coming year may well revolutionize our ability to
study these enigmatic, highly luminous transients. We propose a program of HST
and Chandra observations to capitalize on this extraordinary opportunity. We
will perform some of the most stringent tests yet of the standard model, in
which GRBs represent collimated relativistic outflows from collapsing massive
stars. NICMOS imaging and STIS CCD spectroscopy will detect broad atomic
features of supernovae underlying GRB optical transients, at luminosities more
than three times fainter than SN 1998bw. UV, optical, and X-ray spectroscopy
will be used to study the local ISM around the GRB. Chandra spectroscopy will
investigate whether the GRB X-ray lines are from metals freshly ripped from the
stellar core by the GRB. HST and CTIO infra-red imaging of the GRBs and their
hosts will be used to determine whether `dark’ bursts are the product of
unusually strong local extinction; imaging studies may for the first time
locate
the hosts of `short’ GRBs. Our early polarimetry and late-time broadband
imaging
will further test physical models of the relativistic blast wave that produces
the bright GRB afterglow, and will provide unique insight into the influence of
the GRB environment on the afterglow.

NICMOS 8790

NICMOS Post-SAA calibration – CR Persistence Part 1.

A new procedure proposed to alleviate the CR-persistence problem of NICMOS.
Dark
frames will be obtained immediately upon exiting the SAA contour 23, and every
time a NICMOS exposure is scheduled within 50 minutes of coming out of the SAA.
The darks will be obtained in parallel in all three NICMOS Cameras. The
POST-SAA
darks will be non-standard reference files available to users with a USEAFTER
date/time mark.

STIS/CCD 10087

STIS HITM2 Lamp Brightness Check

We will measure the brightness of the HITM2 lamp at operating currents
3.8mA and
10mA in ACQ-type reference aperture exposures. We will check whether the 10mA
setting can be used in the ACQ procedure without saturation. We will also take
wavecals with HITM2 at 10mA at the grating/central wavelength settings most
commonly used for cycle 12 science.

ACS/WFC 10086

The Ultra Deep Field with ACS

The ACS Ultra Deep Field {UDF} is a survey carried out by using Director’s
Discretionary time. The main science driver are galaxy evolution and cosmology.
The primary instrument is the Advanced Camera for Surveys but WFPC2 and NICMOS
will also be used in parallel. The data will be made public. The UDF
consists of
a single ultra-deep field {410 orbits in total} within the CDF-S GOODS
area. The
survey will use four filters: F435W {55 orbits}, F606W {55 orbits}, F775W {150
orbits}, and F850LP {150 orbits}. The F435W {B} and F606W {V} exposures will be
one magnitude deeper than the equivalent HDF filters. The F775W {I} exposure
will be 1.5 magnitude deeper than the equivalent HDF exposure. The depth in
F775W and F850LP is optimized for searching very red objects – like z=6
galaxies
– at the detection limit of the F850LP image. The pointing will be RA{J2000}=3
32 40.0 and Decl.{J2000}=-27 48 00. These coordinates may change slightly
due to
guide star availability and implementation issues. We will attempt to
include in
the field both a spectroscopically confirmed z=5.8 galaxy and a
spectroscopically confirmed type Ia SN at z=1.3. The pointing avoids the gaps
with the lowest effective exposure on the Chandra ACIS image of CDFS. This
basic
structure of the survey represents a consensus recommendation of a Scientific
Advisory Committee to the STScI Director Steven Beckwith. A local Working Group
is looking in detail at the implementation of the survey.

STIS/CCD 10085

STIS Pure Parallel Imaging Program: Cycle 12

This is the default archival pure parallel program for STIS during cycle 12.

WFPC2 10073

Earth Flats

This proposal monitors flatfield stability. This proposal obtains sequences of
Earth streak flats to construct high quality flat fields for the WFPC2 filter
set. These flat fields will allow mapping of the OTA illumination pattern and
will be used in conjuction with previous internal and external flats to
generate
new pipeline superflats. These Earth flats will complement the Earth flat data
obtained during cycles 4-11.

WFPC2 10069

WFPC2 CYCLE 12 Supplemental Darks, Part 1/3

This dark calibration program obtains 3 dark frames every day to provide data
for monitoring and characterizing the evolution of hot pixels.

WFPC2 10067

WFPC2 Cycle 12 Decontaminations and Associated Observations

This proposal is for the monthly WFPC2 decons. Also included are instrument
monitors tied to decons: photometric stability check, focus monitor, pre- and
post-decon internals {bias, intflats, kspots, & darks}, UV throughput check,
VISFLAT sweep, and internal UV flat check.

ACS/HRC/WFC 10059

CCD Daily Monitor

This program consists of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, the
development
of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in ACS CCD detectors. This
programme will be executed once a day for the entire lifetime of ACS.

ACS/HRC 10050

ACS Earth Flats

High signal sky flats will be obtained by observing the bright Earth with the
HRC and WFC. These observations will be used to verify the accuracy of the
flats
currently used by the pipeline and will provide a comparison with flats derived
via other techniques: L-flats from stellar observations, sky flats from stacked
GO observations, and internal flats using the calibration lamps. Weekly
coronographic monitoring is required to assess the changing position of the
spots.

ACS/WFC 10049

ACS Internal Flat Field Stability

The stability of the CCD flat fields will be monitored using the calibration
lamps and a sub-sample of the filter set. High signal observations will be used
to assess the stability of the pixel-to- pixel flat field structure and to
monitor the position of the dust motes. Shorter exposures will be used to
identify charge traps and to assess the stability of the DQ arrays. Only
internal exposures with the calibration lamps will be required.

ACS/HRC/WFC 10042

CCD Daily Monitor

This program consists of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, the
development
of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in ACS CCD detectors. This
programme will be executed once a day for the entire lifetime of ACS.

STIS/MA1/MA1 10031

STIS MAMA Cycle 12 Deep Wavecals

This program will obtain deep wavecals for the STIS Echelle modes in order to
produce improved dispersions solutions. The new wavelength solution is based on
a physical model of the instrument’s optical elements and will supercede the
empirical polynomial fit. This work is part of the STIS Calibration Enhancement
project conducted at the ST-ECF. Deep wavecals are required in order to take
full advantage of the new line list from the ESA -funded Pt/Cr-Ne calibration
lamp project and to test the predictive power of physical instrument model of
STIS. A second epoch of observations will investigate the issue of MSM
repeatability.

STIS/CCD 10019

CCD Bias Monitor – Part 1

Monitor the bias in the 1×1, 1×2, 2×1, and 2×2 bin settings at gain=1, and 1×1
at gain = 4, to build up high-S/N superbiases and track the evolution of hot
columns.

STIS/CCD 10017

CCD Dark Monitor-Part 1

Monitor the darks for the STIS CCD.

FLIGHT OPERATIONS SUMMARY:

Significant Spacecraft Anomalies: (The following are preliminary reports of
potential non-nominal performance that will be investigated.)

HSTAR 9259 – GSacq(1,0,1) Failed. At AOS flags were set indicating that
GSacq(1,0,1)
at 001/05:48:11 failed due to search radius limit
exceeded on FGS 1 during
LOS. Observations affected: STIS 74,75, NIC 34, ACS
110. Under investigation.

HSTAR 9261 – GSacq(2,1,1) fail to Fine Lock Backup (2,0,2). GSacq(2,1,1) at
002/09:16:26
failed to fine lock backup (2,0,2). No flags were
set indicating search radius
limit exceeded. Observations affected: ACS 157-167,
STIS 91-96, WFPC 129-148.
Under investigation.

COMPLETED OPS REQs: None

OPS NOTES EXECUTED:
911-0 Limit Management during WFPC2 Decontamination @0012202 002/0806z

                            SCHEDULED     SUCCESSFUL    FAILURE TIMES
FGS GSacq                20                       19              001/0604z 
(HSTAR#9259)
FGS REacq                13                       13
FHST Update              40                       40
LOSS of LOCK

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS: None

SpaceRef staff editor.