Recently in the Weather Category


SMOS Sees Triple Superstorms

ESA's versatile water mission tracked Asia's recent storms over land and sea.

The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured Wipha as a Typhoon on Oct. 12 at 0350 UTC and Terra saw it on Oct. 13 at 0125 UTC when it was in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. On Oct. 15 at 0425 UTC Wipha was just southeast of Japan when Aqua flew overhead again.

The Pleiades satellites, operated and built by Astrium, number three company in the world for space technologies, have captured this image of Moore, Oklahoma, which clearly shows the devastation caused by the massive tornado that swept through the region on May 20, 2013.

Winter Storm Hits the Mid-Atlantic

An image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on March 6, 2013, shows a winter storm hitting the U.S. mid-Atlantic region.

The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), was transitioned to NOAA operational organization control Feb. 22. The transition marks the next step of the mission that supports NASA's Earth science research and NOAA's weather forecasting missions.

Early on the morning of February 22, 2013, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime view of heavy snow over the United States.

Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together

A massive winter storm is coming together as two low pressure systems are merging over the U.S. East Coast. A satellite image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 8 shows a western frontal system approaching the coastal low pressure area.

A powerful cold front moving from the central United States to the East Coast is wiping out spring-like temperatures and replacing them with winter-time temperatures with powerful storms in between. An image released from NASA using data from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite provides a stunning look at the powerful system that brings a return to winter weather in its wake.

Forecasters could soon be better able to predict how intense tropical cyclones like Hurricane Sandy will be by analyzing relative-humidity levels within their large-scale environments, finds a new NASA-led study.

Night-time View of Sandy's Landfall

As Hurricane Sandy made a historic landfall on the New Jersey coast during the night of Oct. 29, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NASA/NOAA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite captured this night-time view of the storm.