Titan TOP STORY

Cassini Sees Titan Cooking up Smog

© NASA

Smog on Titan

A paper published this week using data from NASA's Cassini mission describes in more detail than ever before how aerosols in the highest part of the atmosphere are kick-started at Saturn's moon Titan. Scientists want to understand aerosol formation at Titan because it could help predict the behavior of smoggy aerosol layers on Earth.


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Craters on Titan Gradually Filled With Hydrocarbon Sand

© NASA

Titan

Titan's siblings must be jealous. While most of Saturn's moons display their ancient faces pockmarked by thousands of craters, Titan -- Saturn's largest moon -- may look much younger than it really is because its craters are getting erased. Dunes of exotic, hydrocarbon sand are slowly but steadily filling in its craters, according to new research using observations from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Blocks of Hydrocarbon Floating on Titan's Lakes?

Blocks of Hydrocarbon Floating on Titan's Lakes?

A new paper by scientists on NASA's Cassini mission finds that blocks of hydrocarbon ice might decorate the surface of existing lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbon on Saturn's moon Titan.


Bouncing on Titan

ESA's Huygens probe bounced, slid and wobbled its way to rest in the 10 seconds after touching down on Saturn's moon, Titan, in January 2005, a new analysis reveals. The findings provide novel insight into the nature of the moon's surface.


Titan Shows Surprising Seasonal Changes

Titan Shows Surprising Seasonal Changes

Detailed observations of Saturn's moon Titan have now spanned 30 years, covering an entire solar orbit for this distant world. Dr. Athena Coustenis from the Paris-Meudon Observatory in France has analyzed data gathered over this time and has found that the changing seasons of Titan affect it more than previously thought. Coustenis will present these results at the European Planetary Science Congress in Madrid on Friday 28th September.


Navigating the Seas of Titan

Navigating the Seas of Titan

Humanity has landed a rover on Mars. Now, say scientists, it's time to land a boat on Titan. This outlandish scenario could become reality, according to engineers presenting their proposals at the European Planetary Science Congress on 27 September.


River Networks on Titan

River Networks on Titan Video in Story

For many years, Titan's thick, methane- and nitrogen-rich atmosphere kept astronomers from seeing what lies beneath. Saturn's largest moon appeared through telescopes as a hazy orange orb, in contrast to other heavily cratered moons in the solar system.


Winter Is Coming on Titan

Winter Is Coming on Titan

False-color images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft show the development of a hood of high-altitude haze - which appears orange in this image -- forming over the south pole of Saturn's moon Titan.


Vortex Seen at Titan's South Pole

Vortex Seen at Titan's South Pole

Images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft show a concentration of high-altitude haze and a vortex materializing at the south pole of Saturn's moon Titan, signs that the seasons are turning on Saturn's largest moon.


Subsurface Ocean on Titan

Subsurface Ocean on Titan

Data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have revealed Saturn's moon Titan likely harbors a layer of liquid water under its ice shell.


Tropical Methane Lakes on Titan

Tropical Methane Lakes on Titan

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has spied long-standing methane lakes, or puddles, in the "tropics" of Saturn's moon Titan. One of the tropical lakes appears to be about half the size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, with a depth of at least 3 feet (1 meter).