Recently in the Space Medicine Category


Question: Is long-duration exposure to weightlessness associated with impaired cerebral venous outflow and increased risk of jugular venous thrombosis?

Fans of science fiction movies such as Avatar, Aliens, Passengers and 2001: A Space Odyssey all know the concept: space travel to far destinations require humans to hibernate.

A new Northwestern University study discovered that spaceflight -- both aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS) -- has a consistent effect on the gut microbiome.

Microgravity Changes Brain Connectivity

An international team of Russian and Belgian researchers, including scientists from HSE University, has found out that space travel has a significant impact on the brain: they discovered that cosmonauts demonstrate changes in brain connectivity related to perception and movement.

Astronomers Help Wage War On Cancer

Techniques developed by astronomers could help in the fight against breast and skin cancer.

Space Travel And Your Joints

A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints?

An X-ray machine which uses space technology to generate crystal clear images that doctors can use to detect the early signs of cancer has been prioritised for €1.2m of funding by the European Space Agency and the UK Space Agency.

Staying Fit In Space

Astronauts work out for around 90 minutes a day onboard the International Space Station to combat the muscle and bone weakening effects of microgravity.

Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology.

Planning a trip to Mars? You'll want to remember your anti-radiation pills.

The Project Mercury astronauts were military test pilots on active duty who volunteered for these missions.

Before we can run or jump, we walk. Before sending humans to Mars, NASA must understand how the human body is affected by living and working in space.

It's been 55 years since NASA astronaut John Glenn successfully launched into space to complete three orbits aboard the Friendship 7 Mercury spacecraft, becoming the first American to orbit the Earth.

NASA Studies Simulated Radiation

In each life a little rain must fall, but in space, one of the biggest risks to astronauts' health is radiation "rain".

MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a University of Michigan study.

Preliminary research results for the NASA Twins Study debuted at NASA's Human Research Program's annual Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, Texas the week of January 23.

Every day, NASA spacecraft beam down hundreds of petabytes of data, all of which has to be codified, stored and distributed to scientists across the globe.

Members of the successful Apollo space program are experiencing higher rates of cardiovascular problems that are thought to be caused by their exposure to deep space radiation, according to a Florida State University researcher.

Just when you think you've seen it all, our eyes look to be victims of a low-gravity environments, too.

Since the beginning of the space program, astronauts have dealt with the realities of spaceflight from microgravity in weak muscles and space radiation, to sleep deprivation and disorientation.

Studying How Humans Respond To Space Travel

What happens to your body in space? NASA's Human Research Program has been unfolding answers for over a decade.

In space, there is no "up" or "down." That can mess with the human brain and affect the way people move and think in space.

For 28 hours, six subjects will remain lying down and tilted at 12 degrees so their heads are lower than their legs. At times, they live and sleep in a carbon dioxide enriched atmosphere.

In 2011, a report from a National Academy of Sciences' decadal survey emphasized the need to examine and understand the influences that sex and gender have on physiological and psychological or behavioral changes that occur during spaceflight.

Researchers have a good idea what causes immune system changes on Earth--think stress, inadequate sleep and improper nutrition.

Those who travel to space are rewarded with a beautiful sight - planet Earth. But the effects of space travel on the human sense of sight aren't so beautiful.

Finding the key to immunity in Space

Living in space weakens astronauts' immune systems, researchers have discovered. The findings are providing clues on how to tackle diseases on Earth before symptoms appear.

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that a major cause of low blood pressure during standing is the compromised ability of arteries and veins to constrict normally and return blood back to the heart.

Eating the right diet and exercising hard in space helps protect International Space Station astronauts' bones, a finding that may help solve one of the key problems facing future explorers heading beyond low Earth orbit.

The effect of spaceflight on a microscopic worm -- Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) -- could help it to live longer. The discovery was made by an international group of scientists studying the loss of bone and muscle mass experienced by astronauts after extended flights in space.

Are your bones getting stronger or weaker? Right now, it's hard to know. Scientists at Arizona State University and NASA are taking on this medical challenge by developing and applying a technique that originated in the Earth sciences.

New results from research on the International Space Station are offering clues on why astronauts' immune systems don't work as well in space. The findings may benefit the elderly on Earth.

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme mediates microgravity-induced lymphocyte programmed cell death and its inhibition could help astronauts and the elderly.

Just the mention of kidney stones can cause a person to cringe. They are often painful and sometimes difficult to remove, and 10 percent of the population will suffer from them. In space, the risk of developing kidney stones is exacerbated due to environmental conditions. The health risk is compounded by the fact that resource limitations and distance from Earth could restrict treatment options.