Images: Opportunity Arrives At Endeavour Crater

View Across Endeavour Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to capture this raw image looking across Endeavour crater during the rover's 2,686th Martian day, or sol, of work on Mars (Aug. 14, 2011).

Opportunity had arrived at the western rim of 13-mile-diameter (21-kilometer-diameter) Endeavour crater five days earlier. The distant horizon in this image is a portion of the east-northeastern rim of Endeavour. The large rock on the left in the foreground, informally named "Tisdale 1," is about 30 inches (about 80 centimeters) tall. It is part of a group of rocks that appear to have been ejected by the excavation of Odyssey crater on the rim of Endeavour crater.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU larger image

'Ridout' Rock on Rim of Odyssey Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity looked across a small crater on the rim of a much larger crater to capture this raw image from its panoramic camera during the rover's 2,685th Martian day, or sol, of work on Mars (Aug. 13, 2011).

Opportunity had arrived at the western rim of 13-mile-diameter (21-kilometer-diameter) Endeavour crater four days earlier. A portion of the northeastern rim of Endeavour forms the distant horizon in this view. A crater about 66 feet (20 meters) in diameter is on the Endeavour rim near Opportunity's arrival point. From a position south of Odyssey, this view is dominated by a rock informally named "Ridout" on the northeastern rim of Odyssey. The rock is roughly the same size as the rover, which is 4.9 feet (1.5 meters) long. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU Larger image

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'Tisdale 2' Rock, Next Stop for Opportunity

The flat-topped rock just below the center of this raw image from the rover Opportunity's panoramic camera was chosen by the rover team in August 2011 as a stop for inspecting with tools on Opportunity's robotic arm. This image was taken during the 2,688th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 16, 2011), which was seven days after the rover arrived at the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

The rock, informally named "Tisdale 2," displays a different texture than rocks that Opportunity has seen during the rovers' first 90 months on Mars.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU Larger image

On Different Ground - Soil on Endeavour Rim

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity looked down at the soil on the western rim of Endeavour crater to capture this raw image from its panoramic camera during the rover's 2,686th Martian day, or sol, of work on Mars (Aug. 14, 2011).

Opportunity had arrived at the western rim of 13-mile-diameter (21-kilometer-diameter) Endeavour crater five days earlier. The soil at this location has a different texture than any that Opportunity had seen earlier. Among other differences, this site has none of the iron-rich concretions, nicknamed "blueberries," which have been plentiful on the surface at many locations Opportunity has stopped. The largest features on the ground in this image are a few inches or centimeters across.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU Larger image

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