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NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE Images: June 4, 2014

Status Report From: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Posted: Monday, June 9, 2014

- An Alluvial Fan in a Low-Latitude Crater http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_028799_1565

On Mars, alluvial fans are sometimes visible in impact crater basins, as material from the steep rims is transported radially inward to the relatively flat floor.

- Touring a Dusty Region http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_034259_2040

As well as confirming a new impact, this image also showed other features commonly found in dusty areas: slope streaks and bed-forms.

- The Draa of Mars http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_034909_1755

Dune ripples are the smallest bed forms and can only be observed in high-resolution images acquired by HiRISE, and are commonly superposed on many surfaces.

- A Large Crater in Meridiani Planum http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_036397_1785

This crater is located in Meridiani Planum, about 20-kilometers northwest of where the Opportunity rover landed in 2004.

All of the HiRISE images are archived here: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/

Information about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is online at http://www.nasa.gov/mro. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, of Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft. HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., built the HiRISE instrument.

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