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NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE Images: May 22, 2014

Status Report From: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Posted: Tuesday, May 27, 2014

- What Gullies Can Say http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_027989_1425

Right past the sharp, but warped rim of this ancient impact crater are deposits of winter frost, which show up as blue in enhanced color.

- The Busy Flank of Arsia Mons http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_031944_1790

This observation shows an incredible diversity of ancient lava tubes and impact craters filled with sediment on the flank of Arsia Mons.

- At the Edge of a Polar Cap http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_035926_2640

Formative down-slope winds descending on Mars' North Polar ice cap likely play an important role in transporting sediment.

- Global Eyes on an Impact Prize http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_036059_1835

Finding a new dark spot with the Mars Color Imager, HiRISE can literally zoom in to show better details of a new impact crater, an example of coordination among science teams.

All of the HiRISE images are archived here: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/

Information about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is online at http://www.nasa.gov/mro. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, of Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft. HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., built the HiRISE instrument.

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