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Moon: September 2021



On 16 December 2020 the Chang'e-5 mission, China's first sample return mission to the Moon, successfully delivered to Earth nearly two kilograms of rocky fragments and dust from our celestial companion.


Permanently shadowed lunar craters contain water ice, but are difficult to image. A machine learning algorithm now provides sharper images.


The National Science Foundation's Green Bank Observatory (GBO) and National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Raytheon Intelligence & Space (RI&S) have released a new high-resolution image of the Moon, the highest-ever taken from the ground using new radar technology on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT).


In 2023, NASA's Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER) will land near the western edge of the Nobile Crater at the Moon's South Pole to map and explore the region's surface and subsurface for water and other resources.


The International Astronomical Union has named a lunar crater--the "Henson Crater"-- after Dr. Matthew Alexander Henson, an extraordinary explorer who journeyed to Earth's North Pole.


The surface of the Moon is a harsh environment with no air, low gravity, dust, and micrometeorites--tiny rocks or metal particles--flying faster than 22,000 mph.


With scientists beginning to more seriously consider constructing bases on celestial bodies such as the moon, the idea of space mining is growing in popularity.