Moon TOP STORY

Hayn Crater on the Moon

© NASA/ASU/LROC

Hayn Crater

This image was captured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera's (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter satellite.


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The Floor of Crater Harriot B

© ASU

Harriot B

The planets in the Solar System are continuously bombarded by space rocks. This violent process early on formed the planets by accretion, and impacts still shape the surface of terrestrial and icy bodies today.

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Dorsum Nicol

Dorsum Nicol

Dorsum Nicol is a wrinkle ridge found in southern Mare Serenitatis. The opening Featured Image is an LROC NAC image overlaid with a slope map of the region, with warmer colors representing steeper slopes.


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Still Hot Inside the Moon - Tidal Heating in Deep Mantle

Still Hot Inside the Moon - Tidal Heating in Deep Mantle

An international research team has found that there is an extremely soft layer deep inside the Moon and that heat is effectively generated in the layer by the gravity of the Earth.


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Birt E Crater

Birt E Crater

Birt E crater was not created like most craters on the Moon; there was no meteorite impact. Lava sputtered out of this pyroclastic vent in Mare Nubium over 3.4 billion years ago, dispersing lava onto the surface and leaving the crater we see today.


Moon

Apollo 15: The Original Interplanetary Mountaineers

Apollo 15: The Original Interplanetary Mountaineers

The lofty Apennine Mountain Range has two prominent peaks near the Apollo 15 landing site: Mt. (Mons) Hadley (relative height ~4km, or 13,000 ft) to the northeast and Mons Hadley Delta (~3.5 km, 11,500 ft high) to the south.


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A Tortuous Path in Lunar Crater Posidonius

A Tortuous Path in Lunar Crater Posidonius

This may look like a work of abstract art, but in reality, it's our Moon and is for science. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC, is a system of three cameras mounted on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that capture high resolution photos of the lunar surface.


Moon

First Image of the Moon Taken by a U.S. Spacecraft

First Image of the Moon Taken by a U.S. Spacecraft

Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on July 31, 1964 at 13:09 UT (9:09 AM EDT), about 17 minutes before impacting the lunar surface.


Moon

The Moon Eclipses Saturn

The Moon Eclipses Saturn

What happened to half of Saturn? Nothing other than Earth's Moon getting in the way. As pictured above on the far right, Saturn is partly eclipsed by a dark edge of a Moon itself only partly illuminated by the Sun.


Moon

Lunar Pits Could Shelter Astronauts

Lunar Pits Could Shelter Astronauts Video in Story

While the moon's surface is battered by millions of craters, it also has over 200 holes - steep-walled pits that in some cases might lead to caves that future astronauts could explore and use for shelter, according to new observations from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft.


Moon

Video Archive: Looking Back at Apollo 11 45 Years Ago

Video Archive: Looking Back at Apollo 11 45 Years Ago Video in Story

NASA is marking the 45th anniversary of the first moon landing this month. Here in a series of videos from the archives are some of the events of that fateful mission.


Moon

Landsat Looks to the Moon

Landsat Looks to the Moon Video in Story

Every full moon, Landsat 8 turns its back on Earth. As the satellite's orbit takes it to the nighttime side of the planet, Landsat 8 pivots to point at the moon. It scans the distant lunar surface multiple times, then flips back around to continue its task of collecting land-cover information of the sunny side of Earth below.


Moon

Free-Air Gravity Map of the Moon

Free-Air Gravity Map of the Moon

This still image features a free-air gravity map of the Moon's southern latitudes developed by S. Goossens et al. from data returned by the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.


Moon

Soaring Over Lunar Mt. Hadley

Soaring Over Lunar Mt. Hadley

Apollo mission planners selected an adventurous landing site for Apollo 15 located on a relatively small patch of lava plains, called "mare" on the moon.


Moon

Water in Moon Rocks Provides Clues and Questions About Lunar History

Water in Moon Rocks Provides Clues and Questions About Lunar History

A recent review of hundreds of chemical analyses of Moon rocks indicates that the amount of water in the Moon's interior varies regionally - revealing clues about how water originated and was redistributed in the Moon.


Moon

Craters At The Moon's South Pole

Craters At The Moon's South Pole

The dark and shadowed regions of the Moon fascinate astronomers and Pink Floyd fans alike. Our Moon's rotation axis has a tilt of 1.5o, meaning that some parts of its polar regions never see sunlight - the bottoms of certain craters, for example, are always in shadow.



More top stories from August.