Recently in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Category


February 11, 2015 marks five years in space for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which provides incredibly detailed images of the whole sun 24 hours a day.

Sun - Dark Solar Filament Liftoff

The long, dark solar filament that had been visible for many days finally lifted off and broke away into space (September 2, 2014). Filaments are elongated clouds of plasma tethered above the Sun's surface by powerful magnetic forces. Filaments are notoriously unstable.

An active region of the sun just rotating into the view of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory gives a profile view of coronal loops over about a two-day period, from Feb. 8-10, 2014.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Year 4

The Sun is always changing and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory is always watching. Launched on February 11, 2010, SDO keeps a 24-hour eye on the entire disk of the Sun, with a prime view of the graceful dance of solar material coursing through the Sun's atmosphere, the corona.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured approximately 18 hours of video for this dancing plasma from June 24 through June 25. Suspended in twisted magnetic fields, the hot plasma structure is many times the size of planet Earth.

SDO Mission scientists participated in a briefing to discuss the upcoming launch and science of an unprecedented mission to study the sun and its dynamic behavior. The briefing on the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission took place in Washington and the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

NASA Edge @ Solar Dynamics Observatory

It isn't safe to stare at the Sun for you or the NASA EDGE Team, but SDO will be able to do just that with ease 24/7.