NASA FISO Presentation: New Estimates of Space Radiation Risks are Favorable for Human Exploration of Mars

©NASA/UNLV

NASA FISO Presentation: New Estimates of Space Radiation Risks are Favorable for Human Exploration of Mars.

Now available is the July 13, 2016 NASA Future In-Space Operations (FISO) telecon material. The speaker was Francis Cucinotta (UNLV) who discussed "New Estimates of Space Radiation Risks are Favorable for Human Exploration of Mars".

Dr. Francis A. Cucinotta is a Professor of Health Physics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Dr. Cucinotta received his Doctorate degree in nuclear physics from Old Dominion University. He worked at NASA Johnson Space Center from 1997-2013 as the Radiological Health Officer, Space Radiation Project Manager and Chief Scientist. Dr. Cucinotta developed the astronaut exposure data base of organ doses and cancer risk estimates for all human missions from Mercury to the International Space Station (ISS), and developed risk models for acute, cancer and circulatory disease. He was NASA's manager for the construction of the NASA Space Radiation Lab (NSRL), and NSRL Operations from 2003 to 2012. Dr. Cucinotta worked on radiation safety in NASA's mission control for the Space Shuttle and ISS programs in 1989 and 1990, including during the October of 1989 solar event, and from 2000-2006. Dr. Cucinotta has published over 300 journal articles, numerous book chapters and over 100 NASA Technical Reports on nuclear and space physics, shielding, DNA damage and repair, biodosimetry, systems biology, and risk assessment models. He has won numerous NASA Awards for his efforts in research, mission safety, and research management. Dr. Cucinotta is currently the President of the Radiation Research Society, and a Council Member of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements.

Listen to podcast of "New Estimates of Space Radiation Risks are Favorable for Human Exploration of Mars" telecon:

- Download the MP3 File.
- Download the presentation (PDF).

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