Perseverance Takes A Selfie On Mars

©NASA

Perseverance

Here, using its WATSON camera, NASA's Perseverance Mars rover took this selfie over a rock nicknamed "Rochette," on Sept.10, 2021, the 198th Martian day, or sol, of the mission.

Two holes can be seen where the rover used its robotic arm to drill rock core samples.

Scientists tap into an array of imagers aboard the six-wheeled explorer to get a big picture of the Red Planet.

NASA's Perseverance rover has been exploring Jezero Crater for more than 217 Earth days (211 Martian days, or sols), and the dusty rocks there are beginning to tell their story - about a volatile young Mars flowing with lava and water.

That story, stretching billions of years into the past, is unfolding thanks in large part to the seven powerful science cameras aboard Perseverance. Able to home in on small features from great distances, take in vast sweeps of Martian landscape, and magnify tiny rock granules, these specialized cameras also help the rover team determine which rock samples offer the best chance to learn whether microscopic life ever existed on the Red Planet.

Altogether, some 800 scientists and engineers around the world make up the larger Perseverance team. That includes smaller teams, from a few dozen to as many as 100, for each of the rover's cameras and instruments. And the teams behind the cameras must coordinate each decision about what to image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS larger image

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