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Mars: August 2012



This image shows large sand dunes in the North Polar sand sea on Mars. It is one of a series of repeat images of the same dunes, taken at different times, in order to determine the type and extent of changes in the dunes over time.


NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has set off from its landing vicinity on a trek to a science destination about a quarter-mile (400 meters) away, where it may begin using its drill.


NASA's Mars Curiosity has debuted the first recorded human voice that traveled from Earth to another planet and back.


While HiRISE has imaged slope streaks before, bright streaks are not as common as dark ones, so they're of high interest.


NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has begun driving from its landing site, which scientists announced today they have named for the late author Ray Bradbury.


This color-enhanced view -- taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as the satellite flew overhead -- shows the terrain around the rover's landing site within Gale Crater on Mars.


This image is the first high-resolution color mosaic from NASA's Curiosity rover, showing the geological environment around the rover's landing site in Gale Crater on Mars.

The challenge was clear: how do you safely land a 2,000-lb. rover on the surface of Mars? Curiosity, as the Mars Science Laboratory is called, has nearly twice the mass of the landers that put Spirit and Opportunity on Mars in early 2004, and more than three times that of the Pathfinder lander that reached the planet in 1997. It is significantly larger than the Viking landers that touched down in the seventies.


Members of the Curiosity rover team brief media at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California four days into start of the mission on the Martian surface.


This is the first 360-degree panorama in color of the Gale Crater landing site taken by NASA's Curiosity rover. The panorama was made from thumbnail versions of images taken by the Mast Camera.


This color full-resolution image showing the heat shield of NASA's Curiosity rover was obtained during descent to the surface of Mars on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT).


NASA released this MRO HiRISE image of the Mars Curiosity landing site today. All of the spacecraft's components can be seen in this image. A better, color image will be attempted in a few days.


At the final briefing of Monday, August 6th, the NASA team provides updates on the health of the rover after going through the engineering data sent back, discusses where Curiosity landed, shows a few more images and discusses what comes next.


In the first post landing mission briefing on Sol 1 we get a better idea as to where MSL landed and a peak at the spacecraft during descent from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

The Curiosity Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) captured the rover's descent to the surface of the Red Planet. The instrument shot 4 fps video from heatshield separation to the ground.


NASA released an image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter which was taken during the descent of the Mars Science Laboratory with the Curiosity rover and shows the deployed parachute and the spacecraft as it prepares to land.


In a technological feat never before tried the Mars Science Laboratory with the Curiosity Rover landed on Mars on time with apparently no apparent glitches and because the Odyssey orbiter was in a good alignment, a few pictures came in right away.


NASA's most advanced Mars rover Curiosity has landed on the Red Planet. The one-ton rover, hanging by ropes from a rocket backpack, touched down onto Mars Sunday to end a 36-week flight and begin a two-year investigation.


We are only hours away from the landing on Mars of the Mars Science Laboratory with the Curiosity Rover. NASA held one final pre-landing briefing and discussed the landing weather which looks good and answered questions from the media.


If a group of tourists piled out of a transport vehicle onto the surface of Mars, they'd no doubt start snapping pictures wildly. NASA's Curiosity rover, set to touch down on the Red Planet the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (early morning EDT), will take a more careful approach to capturing its first scenic views.


The gravitational tug of Mars is now pulling NASA's car-size geochemistry laboratory, Curiosity, in for a suspenseful landing in less than 40 hours.

On Thursday, August 2nd NASA's Jet propulsion Laboratory provided held a news briefing to talk about the upcoming Mars Curiosity Rover landing.