Recently in the James Webb Space Telescope Category


Today, at 2 p.m. EST, Webb fired its onboard thrusters for nearly five minutes (297 seconds) to complete the final postlaunch course correction to Webb's trajectory.

Last week, the Webb team began moving the observatory's individual mirror segments out of their launch positions.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope team fully deployed its 21-foot, gold-coated primary mirror, successfully completing the final stage of all major spacecraft deployments to prepare for science operations.

As NASA's James Webb Space Telescope makes its way out to its intended orbit, ground teams monitor its vitals using a comprehensive set of sensors located throughout the entire spacecraft.

The James Webb Space Telescope team has fully deployed the spacecraft's 70-foot sunshield, a key milestone in preparing it for science operations.

The Webb team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is especially proud reflecting on their work for the mission, which spans more than two decades and primarily focused on development and testing of the mirrors in extreme cold temperatures at which Webb will operate.

In one of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the 21st century, NASA is launching the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) today--and Northern Arizona University astronomers, planetary astronomers and their students will be using the massive observatory to expand their research and advance our understanding of the solar system.

The James Webb Space Telescope is safely in space, powered on and communicating with ground controllers.

On Saturday, Dec. 11, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was secured on top of the Ariane 5 rocket that will launch it to space from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana.

On Dec. 7, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was transferred to the final assembly building at Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana to meet its Ariane 5 launch vehicle.

In preparation for launch later this month, ground teams have successfully completed the delicate operation of loading the James Webb Space Telescope with the propellant it will use to steer itself while in space.

Detailed atmospheric studies will provide key insights into some of the most common - and mysterious - planets known in the galaxy.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope successfully arrived in French Guiana Tuesday, after a 16-day journey at sea.

The current target launch date for the James Webb Space Telescope is 18 December 2021.

After successful completion of its final tests, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is being prepped for shipment to its launch site.

With the completion of its latest series of milestone tests, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has now survived all of the harsh conditions associated with a rocket launch to space.

Astronomers around the world will have immediate access to early data from specific science observations from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which will be completed within the first five months of Webb's science operations.

The five sunshield layers responsible for protecting the optics and instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope are now fully installed.

Engineers and technicians working on the James Webb Space Telescope successfully completed the first important optical measurement of Webb's fully assembled primary mirror, called a Center of Curvature test.

Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of design, manufacturing, and testing the agency's James Webb Space Telescope.

The 18th and final primary mirror segment is installed on what will be the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever launched.

Inside a massive clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Maryland the James Webb Space Telescope team is steadily installing the largest space telescope mirror ever

Inside NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's massive clean room in Greenbelt, Maryland, the ninth flight mirror was installed onto the telescope structure with a robotic arm.

The James Webb Space Telescope needs to be kept as cold as possible in order to detect infrared light from faint and very distant objects.

This episode of "Behind the Webb" explores the multi-tasking capabilities of one of the cameras on the Webb Space Telescope, the Near-Infrared Spectrograph.

The first of the five sunshield layers that will make it possible for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to image the formation of stars and galaxies created more than 13.5 billion years ago, was delivered to Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE:NOC) Space Park facility April 24.

In this NASA video, engineers from Airbus Defense and Space (DS), Ottobrunn, Germany, dressed in white protective suits and special white gloves, recently completed a delicate surgical procedure to exchange two key components (micro shutter array and focal plane assembly) from the "heart" of an instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

A major test of the sunshield for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was conducted recently by Northrop Grumman in Redondo Beach, California.

The sole secondary mirror and another primary mirror that will fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., on Nov. 5, 2012.

The first two of the 18 primary mirrors to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.