Recently in the Extrasolar Planets Category


In a dim and faraway solar system, astronomers have for the first time discovered a rocky, Earth-sized planet that might hold liquid water -- a necessary ingredient for life as we know it.

Astronomers say that magnetic storms in the gas orbiting young stars may explain a mystery that has persisted since before 2006.

After nearly a decade of development, construction, and testing, the world's most advanced instrument for directly imaging and analyzing planets around other stars is pointing skyward and collecting light from distant worlds.

More than three-quarters of the planet candidates discovered by NASA's Kepler spacecraft have sizes ranging from that of Earth to that of Neptune, which is nearly four times as big as Earth.

Astronomers used the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, to confirm the presence of Kepler-88 c, an unseen planet previously predicted thanks to the gravitational perturbation it caused on its transiting brother planet, Kepler-88 b.

Nearby Failed Stars May Harbor Planet

Astronomers, including Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky, took precise measurements of the closest pair of failed stars to the Sun, which suggest that the system harbors a third, planetary-mass object.

Astronomers have discovered the most distantly orbiting planet found to date around a single, Sun-like star. It is the first exoplanet -- a planet outside of our solar system -- discovered at the University of Arizona.

Another Solar System Similar To Our Own

A team of astrophysicists at the German Aerospace Center, together with German and other European colleagues, has discovered the most extensive planetary system to date.

Scientists from University of California, Berkeley, and University of Hawaii, Manoa, have statistically determined that twenty percent of Sun-like stars in our solar system have Earth-sized planets that could host life

Planets Found Skimming Star's Surface

A new planet-hunting survey has revealed planetary candidates with orbital periods as short as four hours and so close to their host stars that they are nearly skimming the stellar surface.