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Earth: January 2020



This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image features an area in the Santa Cruz Department of Bolivia, where part of the tropical dry forest has been cleared for agricultural use.


NASA's Aqua satellite and its MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) captured this image of southeastern Australia and the burn scars left behind from the violent and vicious bushfires that raged throughout the area and left destruction in their wake.


The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Japanese archipelago - a string of islands that extends about 3000 km into the western Pacific Ocean.


Heavy rainfall has triggered flooding in southern Iran, particularly in the Sistan and Baluchestan, Hormozgan and Kerman provinces.


According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880.


Days after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake rocked Puerto Rico, followed by hundreds of aftershocks, the full extent of damage is only beginning to be realized.


Intense winds blowing from Africa through a mountainous gap on the western Red Sea coast have led to a buildup of summer dust over the Arabian Peninsula in the past decade. This increasing dust load could have long-term health and global climatic implications.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Faroe Islands, located halfway between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic Ocean.


Smoke from bushfires blanket the southeast coastline of Australia as the International Space Station orbited 269 miles above the above the Tasman Sea.


NASA's Terra satellite provided before and after imagery that showed the extent of the fires that have been ravaging Australia's Kangaroo Island.


Wildfires are pictured surrounding Sydney, Australia, as the International Space Station orbited 269 miles above the Tasman Sea.


Lake Guiers and the Senegal River separating the African nations of Senegal and Mauritania are pictured as the International Space Station orbited 257 miles in altitude off the Atlantic coast.