Archives

Earth: June 2019



Utah's Great Salt Lake is pictured as the International Space Station orbited 255 miles above the southwestern United States.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Gulf of Taranto, located on the inner heel of southern Italy.


Orbiting 258 miles above Russia and Mongolia, an Expedition 59 crew member aboard the International Space Station photographed Lake Baikal.


The active volcano of Mount Tambora on the Indonesian province island of West Nusa Tenggara is pictured as the International Space Station orbited 256 miles above the southeast Asian nation.


The International Space Station was 257 miles above the Earth off the coast of the northwestern United States when an Expedition 59 crewmember photographed portions of California and Nevada.


The International Space Station was orbiting 255 miles above the Mediterranean Sea when an Expedition 59 crewmember looking northwest took this photograph of Italy and its island Sicily.


The highly saline Lake Elton in Russia, near the border with Kazakhstan, is the largest mineral lake in Europe.


The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over the Lena River Delta, the largest delta in the Arctic.


Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world.


An extremely large fire was seen in a Suomi NPP satellite image in the Northern Territory of Australia on June 14, 2019.


NASA navigators are helping build a future where spacecraft could safely and autonomously fly themselves to destinations like the Moon and Mars.


Water is so commonplace that we often take it for granted. But too much - or too little of it - makes headlines.


Storm clouds are seen on the southwestern coast of Yemen as the International Space Station was about to fly 254 miles over the Bab al-Mandab Strait in between the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Lake Valencia, in northern Venezuela.This false-colour image was processed in a way that makes vegetation of the Henri Pittier National Park, north of the lake, appear in fluorescent green. These bright colours contrast with the blackness of the lake.


Without the sound advice of meteorologists and geologists working behind the scenes, one of the most consequential battles in human history could have gone quite differently.


Earlier in the week, NOAA's National Hurricane Center was monitoring a low-pressure system in the Gulf of Campeche that has now moved along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines, bringing heavy rainfall. On June 5, NASA used a constellation of satellites to estimate that rainfall.