Archives

Earth: April 2019



From an altitude of 255 miles, an Expedition 59 crewmember photographed the Richat Structure, or the "Eye of the Sahara," in northwestern Mauritania.


Whether they're idyllic floating cotton balls on an otherwise blue sky or ominous grey swirls that block the sun, clouds all begin as an invisible dot of water vapor.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over one of the most remote islands in the world: Easter Island.


On March 17, 2002, the German-US satellite duo GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) were launched to map the global gravitational field with unprecedented precision.


The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over the busy maritime traffic passing through the English Channel.


A ground-breaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo.


After only one year in space, the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) on the International Space Station has given researchers a new understanding of how lightning is created, and how thunderstorms can affect the atmosphere and the climate.


When we think of climate change, one of the first things to come to mind is melting polar ice. However, ice loss isn't just restricted to the polar regions.


This week, ESA is focusing on its core Basic Activities, which, for Earth observation, include preserving precious data.


As the world's earliest known civilization developed in Mesopotamia...as Genghis Khan worked to create the largest contiguous land empire in history...as the Ottomans occupied European and Asian lands for nearly 600 years...each empire had one thing in common.


NASA is ready to launch a new space instrument that will use the vantage point of the International Space Station to monitor Earth's carbon cycle.