Recently in the Stars Category


An international team of astronomers using Hubble have been able to study stellar evolution in real time. Over a period of 30 years dramatic increases in the temperature of the star SAO 244567 have been observed.

Astronomers have identified a young star, located almost 11,000 light years away, which could help us understand how the most massive stars in the Universe are formed.

Alone on the cosmic road, far from any known celestial object, a young, independent star is going through a tremendous growth spurt.

Hubble Unveils Monster Stars

Astronomers using the unique ultraviolet capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have identified nine monster stars with masses over 100 times the mass of the Sun in the star cluster R136.

The glowing region in this new image from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope is a reflection nebula known as IC 2631.

Among the most striking objects in the universe are glittering, dense swarms of stars known as globular clusters.

Single stars are often overlooked in favor of their larger cosmic cousins -- but when they join forces, they create truly breathtaking scenes to rival even the most glowing of nebulae or swirling of galaxies.

Astronomers are finding dozens of the fastest stars in our galaxy with the help of images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE.

University of Texas astronomer Natalie Gosnell has used Hubble Space Telescope to better understand why some stars aren't evolving as predicted.

Aging Star's Weight Loss Secret Revealed

A team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has captured the most detailed images ever of the hypergiant star VY Canis Majoris.

Strange Star Likely Swarmed by Comets

A star called KIC 8462852 has been in the news recently for unexplained and bizarre behavior.

Our Sun is a relatively quiet star that only occasionally releases solar flares or blasts of energetic particles that threaten satellites and power grids.

The Glowing Halo of a Zombie Star

The remains of a fatal interaction between a dead star and its asteroid supper have been studied in detail for the first time by an international team of astronomers using the Very Large Telescope at ESOs Paranal Observatory in Chile.

DI Cha: Smoke Ring for a Halo

Two stars shine through the center of a ring of cascading dust in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers have found the hottest and most massive double star with components so close that they touch each other.

Hubble Sees an Aging Star Wave Goodbye

This planetary nebula is called PK 329-02.2 and is located in the constellation of Norma in the southern sky.

Sibling Stars

The loose speckling of stars in this new ESO image is the open star cluster IC 4651, located within the Milky Way, in the constellation of Ara (The Altar), about 3000 light-years away.

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Seeing Where Stars Collide

Scientists have imaged a cluster of stars, heavily obscured by material in our galaxy, where stars are so densely packed that it is likely a rare environment where stars can collide.

Super-sharp observations with the telescope Alma have revealed what seems to be a gigantic flare on the surface of Mira, one of the closest and most famous red giant stars in the sky.

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy.

A team of astronomers has used the High Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope to conduct spectroscopic observations of Sun-like "superflare" stars first observed and cataloged by the Kepler Space Telescope.

Globular clusters -- dazzling agglomerations of up to a million ancient stars -- are among the oldest objects in the universe.

Stars With Their Chemical Clock On Hold

An international team of astrophysicists, led by Cristina Chiappini from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam, has discovered a group of red giant stars for which the 'chemical clock' does not work.

Many, perhaps most, stars in the universe live their lives with companions by their sides -- in so-called binary systems. Until recently, however, the ancient RR Lyrae stars appeared, for mysterious reasons, to live their lives all alone.

Using data from orbiting observatories, including NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, and ground-based facilities, an international team of astronomers has discovered an outburst from a star thought to be in the earliest phase of its development.

A handful of new stars are born each year in the Milky Way, while many more blink on across the universe. But astronomers have observed that galaxies should be churning out millions more stars, based on the amount of interstellar gas available.

IRAS 15103-5754, a star observed as it was turning into a planetary nebula, yields new clues as to the death of stars akin to the sun

A group of astronomers from the US, Europe, Chile and South Africa have determined that 70,000 years ago a recently discovered dim star is likely to have passed through the solar system's distant cloud of comets, the Oort Cloud.

Exploded Star Blooms Like a Cosmic Flower

Because the debris fields of exploded stars, known as supernova remnants, are very hot, energetic, and glow brightly in X-ray light, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has proven to be a valuable tool in studying them.

The team of astronomers, led by Miguel Santander-Garca (Observatorio Astronmico Nacional, Alcal de Henares, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), has discovered a close pair of white dwarf stars -- tiny, extremely dense stellar remnants -- that have a total mass of about 1.8 times that of the Sun.

Stars' Spins Reveal Their Ages

Stars slow down as they age, and their ages are well-kept secrets. Astronomers are taking advantage of the first fact to tackle the second and tease out stellar ages.

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) may have detected the dusty hallmarks of an entire family of Pluto-size objects swarming around an adolescent version of our own Sun.

Gas Spirals as Nurseries of Twin Stars

Stars form in interstellar clouds of molecular gas and dust.

Most of the stars in our galaxy have been formed in binary or multiple systems, some of which are "eclipsing," that is, consisting of two or more stars which, observed from Earth, undergo eclipses and mutual transits because of their orbital plane tipped edge-on to our planet.

NGC 3532 is a bright open cluster located some 1300 light-years away in the constellation of Carina (The Keel of the ship Argo). It is informally known as the Wishing Well Cluster, as it resembles scattered silver coins which have been dropped into a well.

Certain primordial stars--those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses--may have died unusually. In death, these objects--among the Universe's first-generation of stars--would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.

New modeling studies from Carnegie's Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up.

In this striking new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile young stars huddle together against a backdrop of clouds of glowing gas and lanes of dust.

Rare White Dwarf Systems

In the middle of the twentieth century, an unusual star was spotted in the constellation of Canes Venatici (Latin for "hunting dogs").

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the best ever image of the globular cluster Messier 15, a gathering of very old stars that orbits the center of the Milky Way.

An international team of astronomers has observed part of the final death throes of the largest known star in the universe as it throws off its outer layers. The discovery, by a collaboration of scientists from the UK, Chile, Germany and the USA, is a vital step in understanding how massive stars return enriched material to the interstellar medium -- the space between stars -- which is necessary for forming planetary systems.

Hubble Captures Strange Star Clusters

The beautiful, petal-like shells of galaxy PGC 6240 are captured here in intricate detail by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, set against a sky full of distant background galaxies.

A large hot molecular cloud around a very young star was discovered by ALMA. This hot cloud is about ten times larger than those found around typical solar-mass baby stars, which indicates that the star formation process has more diversity than ever thought. This result was published in Astrophysical Journal Letters on 20 September 2013.

Magnetic Field May Shape 'Blooming' Star

An old star, IRAS 15445-5449, has begun to push out a jet of charged particles that glow with radio waves. A few old stars are known to have jets, "but this is the first one where the radio waves tell us the jet is held together by a strong magnetic field", said Dr Jessica Chapman of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, a member of the research team.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the largest known population of globular star clusters, an estimated 160,000, swarming like bees inside the crowded core of the giant grouping of galaxies known as Abell 1689.

Hubble Sees a Cosmic Caterpillar

This light-year-long knot of interstellar gas and dust resembles a caterpillar on its way to a feast. But the meat of the story is not only what this cosmic caterpillar eats for lunch, but also what's eating it. Harsh winds from extremely bright stars are blasting ultraviolet radiation at this "wanna-be" star and sculpting the gas and dust into its long shape.

Starbirth as Seen by ALMA

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have obtained a vivid close-up view of material streaming away from a newborn star.

Sunset in Mordor - A Star is Born

Don't be fooled by the title; the mysterious, almost mystical bright light emerging from these thick, ominous clouds is actually a telltale sign of forming stars.

Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a young stellar system that "blinks" every 93 days.

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have determined the orbital motion of two distinct populations of stars in an ancient globular star cluster, offering proof they formed at different times and providing a rare look back into the Milky Way galaxy's early days.

NASA has released new images the Spitzer Space Telescope which it characterizes as showing "blooming stars in our Milky Way galaxy's more barren territories, far from its crowded core" and the public, in part, helped NASA with these images.

Astronomers expect that stars like the Sun will blow off much of their atmospheres into space near the ends of their lives. But new observations of a huge star cluster made using ESO's Very Large Telescope have shown - against all expectations - that a majority of the stars studied simply did not get to this stage in their lives at all. The international team found that the amount of sodium in the stars was a very strong predictor of how they ended their lives.