Recently in the Galaxies Category

Hubble Captures a Galactic Waltz

This curious galaxy -- only known by the seemingly random jumble of letters and numbers 2MASX J16270254+4328340 -- has been captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope dancing the crazed dance of a galactic merger.

VISTA Pinpoints The Earliest Giant Galaxies

Just counting the number of galaxies in a patch of sky provides a way to test astronomers' theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

A Distant Galaxy with a Pulse

Astronomers at Yale and Harvard have found a galaxy with a heartbeat -- and they've taken its pulse.

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to conduct a "cosmic archaeological dig" at the very heart of our Milky Way galaxy, astronomers have uncovered the blueprints of our galaxy's early construction phase.

Using a sample of 4,700 blue horizontal-branch stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the research team showed that the oldest stars are concentrated in the central region of the galaxy, confirming predictions from numerical simulations of galaxy assembly.

The Largest Astronomical Image to Date

Astronomers at the Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) have compiled the largest astronomical image to date

Starburst Galaxy Messier 94

This image shows the galaxy Messier 94, which lies in the small northern constellation of the Hunting Dogs, about 16 million light-years away.

Galaxies forming stars at extreme rates nine billion years ago were more efficient than average galaxies today, researchers find.

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity.

Messier 17: A Cosmic Rose With Many Names

This new image of the rose-coloured star forming region Messier 17 was captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile.

The center of our Milky Way galaxy is a mysterious place. Not only is it thousands of light-years away, it's also cloaked in so much dust that most stars within are rendered invisible.

It is known today that merging galaxies play a large role in the evolution of galaxies and the formation of elliptical galaxies in particular.

A Shy Galactic Neighbor

The Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy is pictured in this new image from the Wide Field Imager camera.

Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower. So the nickname for this cosmic object the Sunflower Galaxy is no coincidence.

Astronomers have discovered a rare beast of a galaxy cluster whose heart is bursting with new stars.

A nearby dwarf galaxy poses an intriguing mystery: How is it able to form brilliant star clusters without the dusty, gas-rich environments found in larger galaxies?

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows Messier 96, a spiral galaxy just over 35 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (The Lion).

Farthest Galaxy Detected

A team of Caltech researchers that has spent years searching for the earliest objects in the universe now reports the detection of what may be the most distant galaxy ever found.

In a survey of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope images of 2,753 young, blue star clusters in the neighboring Andromeda galaxy (M31), astronomers have found that M31 and our own galaxy have a similar percentage of newborn stars based on mass.

Cosmic Recycling

Deeply immersed in this huge stellar nursery are three clusters of hot young stars -- only a few million years old -- which glow brightly in ultraviolet light.

The Tumultuous Heart of Our Galaxy

This new image of powerful remnants of dead stars and their mighty action on the surrounding gas from ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory reveals some of the most intense processes taking place at the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way.

Astronomers have uncovered a unique process for how the universe's largest elliptical galaxies continue making stars long after their peak years of star birth.

The Densest Galaxies Known

Two undergraduates at San Jose State University have discovered two galaxies that are the densest known.

Astronomers have long known that powerful cosmic winds can sometimes blow through galaxies, sweeping out interstellar material and stopping future star formation. Now they have a clearer snapshot of how it happens.

This little-known galaxy, officially named J04542829-6625280, but most often referred to as LEDA 89996, is a classic example of a spiral galaxy.

The ghostly shells of galaxy ESO 381-12 are captured here in a new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, set against a backdrop of distant galaxies.

Revealing a Galaxy Far, Far Away...

Scientists have revealed a galaxy five billion light-years away, using a new hi-tech telescope in remote Western Australia.

A group of researchers from the Stony Brook University and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has discovered 854 "ultra dark galaxies" in the Coma Cluster by analyzing archival data from the Subaru Telescope.

Using the Hubble Space Telescope's infrared vision, astronomers have unveiled some of the previously hidden origins of quasars, the brightest objects in the universe.

Astronomers making a detailed, multi-telescope study of a nearby galaxy have discovered a magnetic field coiled around the galaxy's main spiral arm.

Hubble Views a Bizarre Cosmic Quartet

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a gathering of four cosmic companions.

Astronomers using the several of the largest telescopes on Earth and space have discovered the brightest galaxy yet found in the early Universe and found strong evidence that examples of the first generation of stars lurk within it.

ALMA's Long Baseline Campaign produced spectacular images of the distant, gravitationally lensed galaxy called HATLAS J090311.6+003906, otherwise known as SDP.81.

This elliptical galaxy was discovered in March 1781 and lies about 60 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Looking Into The Heart of The Virgo Cluster.

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way.

Merging Galaxies Break Radio Silence

In the most extensive survey of its kind ever conducted, a team of scientists have found an unambiguous link between the presence of supermassive black holes that power high-speed, radio-signal-emitting jets and the merger history of their host galaxies.

A remote galaxy shining with the light of more than 300 trillion Suns has been discovered using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

Galaxy's Snacking Habits Revealed

A team of Australian and Spanish astronomers have caught a greedy galaxy gobbling on its neighbors and leaving crumbs of evidence about its dietary past.

Hubble Spots the Layers of NGC 3923

The glowing object in this Hubble Space Telescope image is an elliptical galaxy called NGC 3923. It is located over 90 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra.

An international team of researchers led by Pieter van Dokkum at Yale University have used the W. M. Keck Observatory to confirm the existence of the most diffuse class of galaxies known in the universe.

As murder mysteries go, it's a big one: how do galaxies die and what kills them? A new study, published today in the journal Nature, has found that the primary cause of galactic death is strangulation, which occurs after galaxies are cut off from the raw materials needed to make new stars.

Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have discovered that the immense halo of gas enveloping the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest massive galactic neighbor, is about six times larger and 1,000 times more massive than previously measured.

An international team of astronomers led by Yale University and the University of California-Santa Cruz have pushed back the cosmic frontier of galaxy exploration to a time when the universe was only 5% of its present age.

The constellation of Cygnus is one of the most recognisable in the northern hemisphere. During the summer months, the stars of its long neck stretch along the Milky Way and its wings sweep from side to side.

Astronomers Find Runaway Galaxies

We know of about two dozen runaway stars, and have even found one runaway star cluster escaping its galaxy forever. Now, astronomers have spotted 11 runaway galaxies that have been flung out of their homes to wander the void of intergalactic space.

Astronomers have shown for the first time how star formation in "dead" galaxies sputtered out billions of years ago.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA) have combined high-resolution images from the ALMA telescopes with a new scheme for undoing the distorting effects of a powerful gravitational lens.

Hubble Views Galaxy NGC 5023 on Edge

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows an edge-on view of the spiral galaxy NGC 5023. Due to its orientation we cannot appreciate its spiral arms, but we can admire the elegant profile of its disk.

More than a million young stars are forming in a hot, dusty cloud of molecular gases in a tiny galaxy near our own, an international team of astronomers has discovered.

Researchers using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have produced the most detailed image yet of a fascinating region where clusters of hundreds of galaxies are colliding, creating a rich variety of mysterious phenomena visible only to radio telescopes.

Like the lost little puppy that wanders too far from home, astronomers have found an unusually small and distant group of stars that seems oddly out of place.

A team of astronomers, led by Darach Watson, from the University of Copenhagen used the Very Large Telescope's X-shooter instrument along with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array to observe one of the youngest and most remote galaxies ever found.

The galaxy pictured here is NGC 4424, located in the constellation of Virgo. It is not visible with the naked eye but has been captured here with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

The MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope has given astronomers the best ever three-dimensional view of the deep Universe.

Why do Starburst Galaxies Burst?

Starburst galaxies transmute gas into new stars at a dizzying pace - up to 1,000 times faster than typical spiral galaxies like the Milky Way.

The majority of stars in our galaxy come in pairs. In particular, the most massive stars usually have a companion.

Active Galaxy NGC 127 in Perseus Cluster

The active galaxy NGC 1275 lies at the center of the cluster of galaxies known as the Perseus Cluster.

NGC 7814 - Little Sombrero

Galaxies can take many shapes and be oriented any way relative to us in the sky.

Galaxies can die early because the gas they need to make new stars is suddenly ejected, research published today suggests.

Galactic Merger Caught by Hubble

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714.

A New View of Galaxy M82

An international team of astronomers led from Chalmers has used the giant radio telescope LOFAR to create the sharpest astronomical image ever taken at very long radio wavelengths.

In this image the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope takes a close look at the spiral galaxy NGC 4217, located 60 million light-years away from Earth. The galaxy is seen almost perfectly edge on and is a perfect candidate for studying the nature of extraplanar dust structures -- the patterns of gas and dust above and below the plane on the galaxy, seen here as brown wisps coming off NGC 4217.

Hubble Views 'Third Kind' of Galaxy

The subject of this image is NGC 6861, a galaxy discovered in 1826 by the Scottish astronomer James Dunlop.

Galaxy groups are the most evident structures in the nearby universe. They are important laboratories for studying how galaxies form and evolve beyond our own Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way and the Great Spiral in Andromeda.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the sharpest and biggest image ever taken of the Andromeda galaxy otherwise known as Messier 31.

Messier 82 Seen in Different Lights

The galaxy Messier 82 (M82) is seen here in two different lights. A visible-light view from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is at left, and an X-ray view from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is at right.

Galaxy IC 335 As Seen by Hubble

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the galaxy IC 335 in front of a backdrop of distant galaxies.

The Milky Way's New Neighbor

The Milky Way, the galaxy we live in, is part of a cluster of more than 50 galaxies that make up the 'Local Group', a collection that includes the famous Andromeda galaxy and many other far smaller objects.

Galaxies - spirals laced with nests of recent star formation, quiescent ellipticals composed mainly of old red stars, and numerous faint dwarfs - are the basic visible building blocks of the universe.

For the first time, an international team of astronomers, led by Dr. James Geach from the University of Hertfordshire, has revealed the dramatic 'blow out' phase of galactic evolution.

Strange Galaxy Perplexes Astronomers

With the help of citizen scientists, a team of astronomers has found an important new example of a very rare type of galaxy that may yield valuable insight on how galaxies developed in the early universe. The new discovery technique promises to give astronomers many more examples of this important and mysterious type of galaxy.

Youthful Compact Galaxies

Researchers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory have uncovered young, massive, compact galaxies whose raucous star-making parties are ending early.

Nestled among a triplet of young galaxies more than 12.5 billion light-years away is a cosmic powerhouse: a galaxy that is producing stars nearly 1,000 times faster than our own Milky Way.

By looking at the dark spaces between visible galaxies and stars the NASA/JPL CIBER sounding rocket experiment has produced data that could redefine what constitutes a galaxy.

When Did Galaxies Settle Down?

Astronomers have long sought to understand exactly how the universe evolved from its earliest history to the cosmos we see around us in the present day.