Recently in the Astrochemistry Category


Astronomers using several telescopes at NOIRLab, including the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, have obtained critical data on a particular type of exploding star that produces copious amounts of calcium.

For the first time, a freshly made heavy element, strontium, has been detected in space, in the aftermath of a merger of two neutron stars.

Astrophysicists know that iron (chemical symbol: Fe) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, after lightweight elements such as hydrogen, carbon and oxygen.

The first type of molecule that ever formed in the universe has been detected in space for the first time, after decades of searching.

Icy Giant Planets In The Laboratory

Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed.

Sometimes it takes a lot of trees to see the forest. In the case of the latest discovery made by astronomers at the University of Arizona, exactly 732,225.

A team of astronomers has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect glowing oxygen in a distant galaxy seen just 700 million years after the Big Bang.

A new survey of hot, X-ray-emitting gas in the Virgo galaxy cluster shows that the elements needed to make stars, planets and people were evenly distributed across millions of light-years early in cosmic history, more than 10 billion years ago.

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, Johns Hopkins astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars.

Scientists from Leiden University have shown in the laboratory how Buckyballs -- molecular soccer balls -- form in space.