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Astronomy: May 2018



Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky Way galaxy, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile.


Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of astronomers is releasing the most comprehensive, high-resolution ultraviolet-light survey of nearby star-forming galaxies.


Astronomers have used observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and ESO's Very Large Telescope to determine that star formation in the very distant galaxy MACS1149-JD1 started at an unexpectedly early stage, only 250 million years after the Big Bang.


A Yale-led research group has created the most detailed maps yet of a vast seedbed of stars similar to Earth's Sun.


Astronomers at the Australian National University (ANU) have found the fastest-growing black hole known in the universe, describing it as a monster that devours a mass equivalent to our Sun every two days.


The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe.


Scientists analyzing the first data from the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission have found two stars that revolve around each other every 38 minutes.


This black hole bounty consists of stellar-mass black holes, which typically weigh between 5 and 30 times the mass of the Sun.


Scientists agree the sun will die in approximately 10 billion years, but they weren't sure what would happen next...until now.


Sure, it sounds kind of far out: a modular space telescope, nearly 100 feet across, composed of individual units launched as ancillary payloads on space missions over a period of months and years, units that will navigate autonomously to a pre-determined point in space and self-assemble.