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Astronomy: May 2017



A long-standing question in astrophysics is: how and when did supermassive black holes appear and grow in the early universe?


Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole.


Pointing the Very Large Array (VLA) at a famous galaxy for the first time in two decades, a team of astronomers got a big surprise, finding that a bright new object had appeared near the galaxy's core.


Axions are particles whose hypothetical existence was introduced in 1977 by Roberto Peccei and Helen Quinn.


A team of international astrophysicists led by The Australian National University (ANU) has shown how most of the antimatter in the Milky Way forms.


The star cluster Hodge 301 is 20 million to 25 million years old. Hodge 301 is home to many aging, red supergiant stars, indicating the cluster is older.


An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has made the first complete millimeter-wavelength image of the ring of dusty debris surrounding the young star Fomalhaut.


This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the unusual galaxy IRAS 06076-2139, found in the constellation Lepus (The Hare).


For the first time, astronomers have detected a magnetic field associated with the Magellanic Bridge, the filament of gas stretching 75 thousand light-years between the Milky Way Galaxy's nearest galactic neighbours: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively).


Supermassive holes are generally stationary objects, sitting at the centers of most galaxies. However, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers recently hunted down what could be a supermassive black hole that may be on the move.


Astronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula


Black holes get a bad rap in popular culture for swallowing everything in their environments. In reality, stars, gas and dust can orbit black holes for long periods of time, until a major disruption pushes the material in.


The NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope has peered across six billion light years of space to resolve extremely faint features of the galaxy cluster Abell 370 that have not been seen before.


A mysterious gamma-ray glow at the center of the Milky Way is most likely caused by pulsars -- the incredibly dense, rapidly spinning cores of collapsed ancient stars that were up to 30 times more massive than the sun.