Archives

April 2019



The International Space Station crosses the terminator, the line that separates night and day on Earth, as it orbits 254 miles above the Gulf of Guinea on Africa's mid-western coast.


This view of the eastern coast of the United States looks from (bottom left to right center) Virginia Beach, Virginia, all the way to Miami, Florida.


The Nile is the longest river in the world, coursing about 6,650 kilometers (4,132 miles) across northeastern Africa to meet the Mediterranean Sea at the broad, green delta in Egypt.


For more than a century, scientists have squabbled over how the Earth's moon formed. But researchers at Yale and in Japan say they may have the answer.


For the first time, a European research team involving the University of Göttingen has discovered the remains of a nova in a galactic globular cluster.


The University of Texas at Austin team that led a twin satellite system launched in 2002 to take detailed measurements of the Earth, called the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), reports in the most recent issue of the journal Nature Climate Change on the contributions that their nearly two decades of data have made to our understanding of global climate patterns.


A grain of dust forged in the death throes of a long-gone star was discovered by a team of researchers led by the University of Arizona.


The six-member Expedition 59 crew conducted a routine, periodic drill for response to emergencies today in the middle of a science-packed day. The astronauts also researched space biology while preparing for next week's SpaceX Dragon cargo mission.


The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research.


Hubble's measurements of today's expansion rate do not match the rate that was expected based on how the Universe appeared shortly after the Big Bang over 13 billion years ago.


Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country.


What could be the first sound of a marsquake, helping astronauts bust the dust on future missions to the Moon, and celebrating our home planet ... a few of the stories to tell you about - This Week at NASA.


NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Australia's northeast state of Queensland, where a large amount of sediment is visible gushing into the Coral Sea, close to the Great Barrier Reef lagoon.


Vein scans and eye checks were on the schedule today as the Expedition 59 crew continues ongoing biomedical studies.


A team from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering that designed a greenhouse for Mars has been announced the winner of the 2019 NASA BIG Idea Challenge today at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.


There are two primary causes of global mean sea level rise -- added water from melting ice sheets and glaciers, and the expansion of sea water as it warms. The melting of Antarctica's ice sheet is currently responsible for 20-25% of global sea level rise.


This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the entire M87 galaxy in infrared light. The EHT image, by contrast, relied on light in radio wavelengths and showed the black hole's shadow against the backdrop of high-energy material around it.


The Expedition 59 crew is unloading one U.S. cargo ship today and preparing for the arrival of another after it launches from Florida next week.


The frozen southern tip of Hudson Bay, which lies in between Ontario and Quebec, is pictured as the International Space Station orbited 258 miles above Canada.


NASA astronaut Christina Koch works to remove and replace the treadmill, also known known as the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, inside the Tranquility module.


The Expedition 59 crew spent the majority of Tuesday conducting space experiments and setting up research hardware.


Dust can be a nuisance -- on Earth and the Moon. Astronauts exploring the Moon's South Pole will need a way to help keep pesky lunar dust out of hard to reach places.


NASA's Mars InSight lander has measured and recorded for the first time ever a likely "marsquake."


The Expedition 59 crew has been unpacking Northrop Grumman's Cygnus cargo craft over the weekend and began science operations on the newly delivered space research.


Rescue team members are using a Boeing CST-100 Starliner training capsule, known as Boiler Plate 3, to practice uprighting procedures in the unlikely event of an emergency resulting in a splashdown.


From an altitude of 255 miles, an Expedition 59 crewmember photographed the Richat Structure, or the "Eye of the Sahara," in northwestern Mauritania.


The International Space Station was orbiting 258 miles above Canada when an Expedition 59 crew member photographed Manicouagan Crater (right center) and the St. Lawrence River in Quebec.


For the past few months, the clean room floor in High Bay 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, has been covered in parts, components and test equipment for the Mars 2020 spacecraft, scheduled for launch toward the Red Planet in July of 2020.


Whether they're idyllic floating cotton balls on an otherwise blue sky or ominous grey swirls that block the sun, clouds all begin as an invisible dot of water vapor.


Incoming asteroids have been scarring our home planet for billions of years.


After its capture this morning at 5:28 a.m. EDT, the Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft was bolted into place on the International Space Station's Earth-facing port of the Unity module at 7:31 a.m. At the time of installation, Cygnus was flying 255 miles above the Indian Ocean just south of Singapore.


An extended stay in space for one of our astronauts, a new resupply mission to the space station, and locating the universe's first type of molecule ... a few of the stories to tell you about - This Week at NASA.


NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.


The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over one of the most remote islands in the world: Easter Island.


The Cygnus space freighter is on orbit today and refining its approach to the International Space Station following its launch from Virginia Thursday afternoon.


A research team in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed new concept of fire extinguisher optimized for space-use; named Vacuum Extinguish Method (VEM).


The first type of molecule that ever formed in the universe has been detected in space for the first time, after decades of searching.


This incredible image of the hourglass-shaped Southern Crab Nebula was taken to mark the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's 29th anniversary in space.


How do you explore the interior of a planet without ever touching down on it? Start by watching the way the planet spins, then measure how your spacecraft orbits it -- very, very carefully.


Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, a team of researchers, led by astronomers at San Diego State University, detected the new Neptune-to-Saturn-size planet orbiting between two previously known planets.


An international team of astronomers, including faculty and alumni from UNLV, has discovered a new way to spot when collisions occur in distant galaxies between two neutron stars - incredibly dense, city-sized celestial bodies that possess the most powerful magnetic fields in the universe.


On March 17, 2002, the German-US satellite duo GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) were launched to map the global gravitational field with unprecedented precision.


The first interstellar object, `Oumuamua, was discovered in the Solar System by Pan-STARRS in 2017, allowing for a calibration of the abundance of interstellar objects of its size ∼100 m.


A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world.


Researchers from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, report that streams of meteoroids striking the Moon infuse the thin lunar atmosphere with a short-lived water vapor.


NASA is working right now to send American astronauts to the surface of the Moon in five years, and the agency has its sights set on a place no humans have ever gone before: the lunar South Pole.


NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission released its fifth year of survey data on April 11, 2019.


On its final flyby of Saturn's largest moon in 2017, NASA's Cassini spacecraft gathered radar data revealing that the small liquid lakes in Titan's northern hemisphere are surprisingly deep, perched atop hills and filled with methane.


Globular clusters are inherently beautiful objects, but the subject of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, Messier 3, is commonly acknowledged to be one of the most beautiful of them all.


The plan to put humans on the Moon by 2024, wrapping up a series of spacewalks on the space station, and an historic first look at a black hole ... a few of the stories to tell you about - This Week at NASA.


The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over the busy maritime traffic passing through the English Channel.


NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.


A ground-breaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo.


Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research and collaborators have used simulations to show that the photons emitted by long gamma-ray bursts--one of the most energetic events to take place in the universe--originate in the photosphere--the visible portion of the "relativistic jet" that is emitted by exploding stars.


SpaceX accomplished its primary mission of launching the Arabsat-6A telecommunication satellite late this afternoon from famed Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.


When President Trump announced plans to create a new military service for space in 2018, it took many by surprise. But the idea of creating a Space Force had been simmering behind the scenes for decades.


The Expedition 59 crew is now training to capture a U.S. cargo ship when it arrives at the International Space Station next week. The orbital lab residents are also busy researching how living in space affects the human mind and body.


As part of the EU project "Beyond EPICA - Oldest Ice", experts from 14 institutions located in 10 European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice sheet to find the ideal location to retrieve the oldest ice core on the Earth


In the past three decades, almost 4,000 planet-like objects have been discovered orbiting isolated stars outside the Solar System (exoplanets).


Brown dwarfs fill the "gap" between stars and the much smaller planets - two very different types of astronomical objects.


The Expedition 59 crew has switched focus from Monday's spacewalk to microgravity science aboard the International Space Station. Soon, the orbital residents will be unpacking a pair of U.S. space freighters.


The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) -- a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration -- was designed to capture images of a black hole.


A new, first-of-its-kind space weather model reliably predicts space storms of high-energy particles that are harmful to many satellites and spacecraft orbiting in the Earth's outer radiation belt.


After only one year in space, the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) on the International Space Station has given researchers a new understanding of how lightning is created, and how thunderstorms can affect the atmosphere and the climate.


The long-standing debate on the existence of ancient oceans on Mars has been recently revived by evidence for tsunami resurfacing events that date from the Late Hesperian geological era.


When plants take in too much energy, they don't get fat -- they lighten up.


Expedition 59 Flight Engineers Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency concluded their spacewalk at 2 p.m. EDT.


NASA successfully launched the Auroral Zone Upwelling Rocket Experiment or AZURE mission on April 5 from the Andøya Space Center in Norway.


An X-ray machine which uses space technology to generate crystal clear images that doctors can use to detect the early signs of cancer has been prioritised for €1.2m of funding by the European Space Agency and the UK Space Agency.


Astronauts work out for around 90 minutes a day onboard the International Space Station to combat the muscle and bone weakening effects of microgravity.


New Earth-based telescope observations show that auroras at Jupiter's poles are heating the planet's atmosphere to a greater depth than previously thought -- and that it is a rapid response to the solar wind.


Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space.


When we think of climate change, one of the first things to come to mind is melting polar ice. However, ice loss isn't just restricted to the polar regions.


Accelerating a human return to the Moon, wrapping up testing of our Space Launch System rocket engines, and Curiosity captures eclipses on Mars ... a few of the stories to tell you about - This Week at NASA.